When you hear someone in the government, or our President, promote the idea of change, what do they mean?

change    (chānj)  
v.   changed, chang·ing, chang·es

v.   tr.

    1. To cause to be different: change the spelling of a word.
    2. To give a completely different form or appearance to; transform: changed the yard into a garden.
    3. To lay aside, abandon, or leave for another; switch: change methods; change sides.
    4. To transfer from (one conveyance) to another: change planes.
  1. To give and receive reciprocally; interchange: change places.
  2. To exchange for or replace with another, usually of the same kind or category: change one’s name; a light that changes colors.
    1. To lay aside, abandon, or leave for another; switch: change methods; change sides.
    2. To transfer from (one conveyance) to another: change planes.
  3. To give or receive the equivalent of (money) in lower denominations or in foreign currency.
  4. To put a fresh covering on: change a bed; change the baby.

v.   intr.

  1. To become different or undergo alteration: He changed as he matured.
  2. To undergo transformation or transition: The music changed to a slow waltz.
  3. To go from one phase to another, as the moon or the seasons.
  4. To make an exchange: If you prefer this seat, I’ll change with you.
  5. To transfer from one conveyance to another: She changed in Chicago on her way to the coast.
  6. To put on other clothing: We changed for dinner.
  7. To become deeper in tone: His voice began to change at age 13.

n.  

  1. The act, process, or result of altering or modifying: a change in facial expression.
  2. The replacing of one thing for another; substitution: a change of atmosphere; a change of ownership.
  3. A transformation or transition from one state, condition, or phase to another: the change of seasons.
  4. Something different; variety: ate early for a change.
  5. A different or fresh set of clothing.
    1. Money of smaller denomination given or received in exchange for money of higher denomination.
    2. The balance of money returned when an amount given is more than what is due.
    3. Coins: had change jingling in his pocket.
    4. A pattern or order in which bells are rung.
    5. In jazz, a change of harmony; a modulation.
  6. Music
    1. A pattern or order in which bells are rung.
    2. In jazz, a change of harmony; a modulation.
  7. A market or exchange where business is transacted.

Phrasal Verb(s):
change off

  1. To alternate with another person in performing a task.
  2. To perform two tasks at once by alternating or a single task by alternate means.


Idiom(s):
change hands To pass from one owner to another.

Idiom(s):
change (one’s) mind To reverse a previously held opinion or an earlier decision.

Idiom(s):
change (one’s) tune To alter one’s approach or attitude.

[Middle English changen, from Norman French chaunger, from Latin cambiāre, cambīre, to exchange, probably of Celtic origin.]

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